Workplace sexism

In the past six months I’ve had three managers. The one I was hired by resigned, moving the entire team to his boss. After a while, that guy was told he couldn’t manage folk two-three levels below him, so we got redistributed to new-to-us managers.

Before my initial boss left, we did the annual review process (four months early.) The way he and his boss both handled my engagement, successes, and professional growth both externally and with internal products was underwhelming. To the point both discouraged me from seeking additional professional development outside of our company, asking me to focus on the product we support.

Ok, that is great. Except that I’ve been mentoring and training others on our internal product for over a year. I am constantly sending suggestions or writing up how to documents both for internal and external use, and acting as a support to peers on said product. I’ve clearly demonstrated an expertise on it.

I was sorely disappointed that with my 13 years experience in the field, 9 years experience in the industry of HCMs, having a degree and multiple certifications that I wasn’t even given the target merit increase this year. That I wasn’t brought up to market rate for someone with 1 year experience in the field. Never mind that I’ve spoken with my local peers and all the women are $10k+ underpaid compared to the men with often less experience and no certs or degrees in the field.

I had asked my former boss’s boss if the gender inequality was reviewed. He hadn’t even thought of it, let alone looked into it. He knows I know Compensation. Just the ease I displayed in using terms and concepts, never mind those wonderful three letters after my name.

My current manager is a breath of fresh air. SHE encourages me to seek out professional development both on our product and externally. She recognizes my expertise and all I have done to help others. She comes to me to double check others work or to help figure out very difficult things.

I was exceedingly thrilled when in one conversation I flat out asked her, “It sounds like you are grooming me for a promotion. Is this your intent?” She confirmed it was. Woohoo!

I find it very interesting how different the management styles and how they view me and what I have to offer are between the men and women in the business unit. I’m not prepared to say it is the whole company, because it is clear looking at the C suite that isn’t the case.

Certified Compensation Professional

Today I took (and totally crushed) the T4: Strategic Communication course.

The test was 84 minutes (plus 6 for orientation to the test) for 75 questions. As I suspected from the course material it was the “old” version that I expect will be updated in the next few years. I figured it out since it still has global items integrated with the material. This meant the test was very cut and dry with maybe 5 questions that you had to pick the best of three correct answers.

I am super proud to state that this was the final test to obtain the Certified Compensation Professional.

 

Pokemon Go and the future of busines

Pokemon Go has taken over everything it seems. Everyone is talking about it, many are playing it. I’ve seen a lot of stories – good and bad – as well as how this is impacting business. From developing new businesses (uber driver for Pokemon hunting, at slow speeds to simulate walking) to how to regulate it in the office.

What I haven’t heard from anyone yet is how this will change business in the future. We already have the ability to have targeted ads at bus stops and technology that was so far fetched that Star Trek predicted it decades ago. But how can augmented reality impact shopping and improve our lifestyles?

Pokemon Go is changing not just gaming, but our very lives. Those who think of how to use similar (or better) technology to improve business, lifestyle, and health of the world will be on the cutting edge. I’m willing to bet, as my dad says, dollars to donuts, that in two to three years we will see the beginnings of what entrepreneurs and visionaries are starting to work on right now. In five years this sort of thing will be common place. In ten years we will have evolved way past this and onto the next life changing thing.

How can you prepare your business to function better, faster, more efficiently, increase margins to position itself in that future? How will your workforce change? How will your policies and procedures change? Think about the myriad opportunities for team building, recognition, retention, even impacts on health insurance rates and employee wellness programs. How about recruiting? Compensation plans and strategies?

At the very least we know that battery life will improve exponentially in the next year or two. lol I look forward to when transporters aren’t just for Sci Fi media. šŸ˜‰

C8: Business Acumen

Yesterday I took the World At Work Business Acumen test. I was very surprised.

The test was 114* minutes for 78 multiple choice questions. There was a small amount of math (1 question.)

Why was I surprised? That boils down to two answers. The first is that there were about 10-15 questions that were about concepts that were not in the testing material (self study book or the supplemental case study.) The second was that about half the test was a level of questioning akin to the SPHR rather than the previous 8 tests I had taken through this certification track.

When I state the questions were SPHR level, the questions were not straight forward what is X? In stead you had to use your knowledge of the concepts and vocabulary to extrapolate and think about the situation presented and each of the answers for the best answer (as sometimes two or three were correct, just one was better than the others.) Ā Considering the majority of the previous 8 tests were much more straight forward and representativeĀ of the material rather than its applications this was… challenging.

I was also surprised that not a single one of the “Test your knowledge” or end of module questions were utilized, as had been on the previous 8 tests. That and there was no survey afterwards to give feedback about the test itself.

The one math question fits into the category of “was not in the preparation material.” I took a guess at how to calculate the answer. For having numerous equations and financial concepts, to ask about one NOT in the material felt underhanded.

I feel that the materials provided did not accurately prepare one for the test.

While I did pass it, I don’t feel much satisfaction from doing so.

Considering much of the material for the course was a repeat from a number of the other courses, having this new test added to the required track for certification just feels like a money grab rather than actual preparing and ensuring one is knowledgeable on the topic and can act in a means to benefit their organization or advance their career.

I recognize the course (and thus also the test) is new. There are many bugs to work out.

*6 minutes for the “tutorial” if one has not taken a test before. If you don’t use the full six minutes then you lose that time, it is not added to your time for the “real” test.

Tis the season…

The holidays are here and no matter how or what one celebrates, there are some common themes. One of those themes coincides with one of the (free) ways to help improve an organization, business, morale, and retention: gratitude.

Image from http://jeanniepage.com/tag/gratitude-tree/

Since my last post, it is probably no surprise, that I have a new job with a new company. The environment and atmosphere (so far) feels completely different than my prior employer.

The biggest thing that I’ve seen and felt a change in is respecting employees and their time/effort/skills. There is a culture of gratitude that is refreshing and “real.” I repeatedly hear “thank you” and how people mean it.

So often people say thank you by rote or because it is forced. To feel sincerity in being appreciated really makes a difference.

Next time you say it, pay attention to how you say it. Pay attention to how often it is genuinely meant when you hear it and how it makes you feel.

You might be surprised.