Tag Archives: leadership

Pokemon Go and the future of busines

Pokemon Go has taken over everything it seems. Everyone is talking about it, many are playing it. I’ve seen a lot of stories – good and bad – as well as how this is impacting business. From developing new businesses (uber driver for Pokemon hunting, at slow speeds to simulate walking) to how to regulate it in the office.

What I haven’t heard from anyone yet is how this will change business in the future. We already have the ability to have targeted ads at bus stops and technology that was so far fetched that Star Trek predicted it decades ago. But how can augmented reality impact shopping and improve our lifestyles?

Pokemon Go is changing not just gaming, but our very lives. Those who think of how to use similar (or better) technology to improve business, lifestyle, and health of the world will be on the cutting edge. I’m willing to bet, as my dad says, dollars to donuts, that in two to three years we will see the beginnings of what entrepreneurs and visionaries are starting to work on right now. In five years this sort of thing will be common place. In ten years we will have evolved way past this and onto the next life changing thing.

How can you prepare your business to function better, faster, more efficiently, increase margins to position itself in that future? How will your workforce change? How will your policies and procedures change? Think about the myriad opportunities for team building, recognition, retention, even impacts on health insurance rates and employee wellness programs. How about recruiting? Compensation plans and strategies?

At the very least we know that battery life will improve exponentially in the next year or two. lol I look forward to when transporters aren’t just for Sci Fi media. 😉

Continuous Improvement and Poker Face

There are days I love my job, today was one of them.

I’m a big believer that nothing is ever set in stone, nor should it. I had the privilege and pleasure to be part of my second experience to review current processes with a cross sectional team to change things for the better. I swear that my employer’s unspoken motto is akin to Big Brother, “expect the unexpected.”

Continuous improvement has many names depending upon the industry. It is a long, painful process. It has proved interesting to see how the “future state” and “pie in the sky” end result actually implements. Luckily, regardless of how close reality is to the envisioned future state, improvements are generally the result.

Even when not leading the team (although it could be done by HR for any company) it shows just how much HR (be it generalist or a specialist) are project managers. Let’s face it, if it is an I-9 Audit; AAP; annual enrollment; updating the on boarding process; reviewing job descriptions, salary structures, and employee alignment – HR is nothing but projects and improving things!

Another very important part of HR is having a poker face. I read in the past year a great article about how to improve yours and been practicing! (Read my admitting to failing at it here.)I felt that I did a fabulous job at using it in the meeting today, only emitting one raised eyebrow over the course of 9 hours (while on 4 hours sleep and being in physical pain.) But I know that I have mastered it due to a recent four day ordeal in my personal life where despite being under tremendous stress and difficult situations I held it together for the 90% of the time.

Do you have any stories or tips to share about continuous improvement or poker faces?

Chief Financial Officer

For the past tw0 years I have had the honor and privilege of being the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of a nonprofit. The organization is a 501(c)7 with annual gross receipts under $50,000.

Image from http://myob.com.au/

I have learned a lot in these years about accounting, forecasting, budgeting, insurance, tax, credit, statistics, and reporting. In the beginning I relied heavily upon resources from preparing for my PHR and World at Works’s Accounting and Finance for the Human Resources Professional. I got to expand my experience in leadership, as the role was an Officer of the organization (reporting to the CEO and on the same level as the COO) as well as management as I had two “minions” that reported to me and assisted me with various items (one was keying data, the other with preparing taxes.)

In my tenure, I accomplished all of the goals I set those 26 months ago. Let me illustrate the situation when I started the role: 5 months before I took the role the former CFO was found to have (and admitted to) stealing funds from the organization. Due to on going investigations I can’t say much, but corporate counsel has stated I can share it was tens of thousands of dollars. The organization, being 100% volunteer run and operations financed 100% by donations this was a huge challenge to take on.

I am very happy to state that through my aforementioned skills (budgeting, etc) and working with a fantastic Executive team, I was able to repay nearly $10,000 in debt; build up a financial cushion of $10,000+; create reporting where previously there was none; documented the heck out of policies and procedures for a layman to understand and is also compliant with FASB standards. Repairing the trust of the organization donors was of paramount importance, to which I went to great lengths to improve transparency surrounding all financial matters. I reduced financial waste with the new procedures/policies saving the organization $1,000+ annually. My biggest accomplishment was playing forensic accountant and going through the previous three years of records to audit, amend taxes, and provide documentation towards the on going actions against the former CFO.

I am very proud of this accomplishment and experience. Like all good things, this is coming to an end. I have submitted my resignation. Being that it was a volunteer position (aka no pay) and it takes a lot of time (30-40 hour a week!) I feel I need to redirect my energy and time into that which pays me and being a more well rounded individual for better balance, grounding, and thus leave me able to offer more in what I do. I look forward to training my successor and ensuring that they are set up for success, so that the organization can also be successful.

SHRM certification

Congratulations on achieving your SHRM-CP.

Today I took advantage of the SHRM-CP tutorial to get the certification for free. I have to say that I actually like and see the validity of the competency based nature of this certification and how it will lend credence to Human Resources as a whole and a business partner.

I have largely staid out of the fray between the HRCI vs SHRM certification war. I’ve chosen to wait it out to see the offerings for comparison and see what the results are to organizations, professionals, and the profession as a whole over time. Without data it is hard to give an educated guess, and everyone has an opinion. 😉 I like my opinions to have weight.

It is early yet, since the certification was just offered for the first time three months ago, but it will be interesting to see when and which roles will require or prefer this certification. It will be interesting to see if it will be placed in relation to the HRCI certifications.

The part I enjoyed the most was the competency check lists. I answered as truthfully as possible, so that it could be a useful tool to me. I was pleasantly surprised that both my professional (paid) and volunteer experience places me predominantly in the Exec category.

Beaushene SHRM-CP competency chart

Beaushene SHRM-CP chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

The process took less than an hour, and was free. Can’t beat that! I really liked the situations and questions offered. Again, in the vein of being honest, I chose the best choice 7 of 9 times, the second best choice once, and one of the “what the heck, totally the wrong choice” once.

For one that does not currently have an HRCI or IPMA-HR to take the test is $300, which is $100 cheaper than the HRCI PHR. Being so new, it may not be eligible for tuition or expense reimbursement from organizations yet. To be fair, it has been five years since I took the PHR, so I cannot legitimately compare the SHRM-CP scenario quesitons to those of the PHR.

If an organization does reimburse you, why not go for both? Until the dust clears – which may be five to ten years from now, it is best to hedge ones bets. 😉 But if one is paying out of pocket, I would go for the HRCI certification simply due to its history and being well known.

Good luck which ever you decide. May the odds be in your favor!

Innovative?

http://opencloudconsortium.org/At my work I’m in groundhog mode: keep my head down, do my work (well), and just get by. It is not something I would say is worthy of A or rockstar players, is not something I’m proud of, and has a number of reasons why that I won’t go into.

With that in mind, I was pleasantly surprised when I received a formal recognition from a new hire that I was “mentoring.” Mentoring is in quotes as that is what the program is called, it is not mentoring as most would think.

“Your  guidance and support has given me a fresh outlook on innovation. Having you as a mentor has made a difference in the professional I want to be in my role. Thank you for all that you have shared!”

I appreciate the managing up she is doing. But, I feel a bit chagrined. I told her what is realistic. ‘In 20 months I have never used this program. Be aware it exists and what it offers, don’t stress about the ins and outs of how to use it.’

I dunno. I don’t think I’m innovative.

Yet, on the flip side, at the nonprofit I volunteer for, in training my successor as Director of the Department of Administration I find that >75% of what the department does is due to my seeing a need and getting the programs initiated. This could be seen as innovation. But again, getting performance reviews in place, applicant tracking, showing multi-year trends in reports, adding photos to the Annual Report – those aren’t innovative type things.

What do you think is innovative? Have you done anything that is viewed as such? Share!