Tag Archives: raise

Workplace sexism

In the past six months I’ve had three managers. The one I was hired by resigned, moving the entire team to his boss. After a while, that guy was told he couldn’t manage folk two-three levels below him, so we got redistributed to new-to-us managers.

Before my initial boss left, we did the annual review process (four months early.) The way he and his boss both handled my engagement, successes, and professional growth both externally and with internal products was underwhelming. To the point both discouraged me from seeking additional professional development outside of our company, asking me to focus on the product we support.

Ok, that is great. Except that I’ve been mentoring and training others on our internal product for over a year. I am constantly sending suggestions or writing up how to documents both for internal and external use, and acting as a support to peers on said product. I’ve clearly demonstrated an expertise on it.

I was sorely disappointed that with my 13 years experience in the field, 9 years experience in the industry of HCMs, having a degree and multiple certifications that I wasn’t even given the target merit increase this year. That I wasn’t brought up to market rate for someone with 1 year experience in the field. Never mind that I’ve spoken with my local peers and all the women are $10k+ underpaid compared to the men with often less experience and no certs or degrees in the field.

I had asked my former boss’s boss if the gender inequality was reviewed. He hadn’t even thought of it, let alone looked into it. He knows I know Compensation. Just the ease I displayed in using terms and concepts, never mind those wonderful three letters after my name.

My current manager is a breath of fresh air. SHE encourages me to seek out professional development both on our product and externally. She recognizes my expertise and all I have done to help others. She comes to me to double check others work or to help figure out very difficult things.

I was exceedingly thrilled when in one conversation I flat out asked her, “It sounds like you are grooming me for a promotion. Is this your intent?” She confirmed it was. Woohoo!

I find it very interesting how different the management styles and how they view me and what I have to offer are between the men and women in the business unit. I’m not prepared to say it is the whole company, because it is clear looking at the C suite that isn’t the case.

Our biggest asset

… is our people.

Image from Changeyourgamebealeader.com

I’m sure you’ve heard it from hundreds of employers, read it in handbooks, and rolled your eyes as hard as I do.

Sabrina hits a nail fairly square in her latest post about how important it is for a company to know it’s employees.

In my company I’ve noticed a very interesting pattern in the past year. It’s a pattern that isn’t unexpected. We are starting to have a large number of voluntary turnover, especially at higher levels. Why? I theorize that the economy has crossed the tipping point, because these people are choosing to leave rather than it being involuntary.  (I have other theories based on other patterns, but that is another post.)

Frankly, I don’t blame them. My current manager whom I’ve worked under for  over a year doesn’t know I’m where I call home, nor have they communicated to me why I got an unexpected raise three months ago. They don’t know me, nor do they show that they care anything about me or understand the company’s actions/motivations.

To a recruiter, I am ripe for the plucking. And if I do say so, I’m quite the catch. 😉

A very wise leader once told me that employees are the company’s clients. I believe it was hearing those words echo in my head while reading Sabrina’s post led to my nodding head and this earnest post. If your employees are your clients, just as important as those that purchase your goods and services, why aren’t you treating them better and getting to know them?

Another point Sabrina slyly snuck into her post is that I have to wonder, why so many benefits – like tuition reimbursement – are underutilized. A strong suspicion I have based on what I have seen in my own career and in working with thousands of clients, is that it isn’t communicated! Imagine if, in a chat between coworkers or manager/subordinate in getting to know one’s dream that they could match it with an existing program? An employee who loves to volunteer at their local polling location learns that the company gives you a paid day to do that! Imagine the good will built with five minutes and no money (because the program is already in place.)

Sure, everyone is replaceable. But with the costs of replacing employees, do you really want to focus your resources on attracting, rather than retaining? You work to retain your clients/customers, don’t you? Well, your employees are just as important to woo; they are your customers too.